Dyson Launched A New Table Lamp & Personal Fan Today

This afternoon, Dyson launched three new products in Singapore—namely an updated version of their cordless vacuum cleaner, a personal fan, and a table lamp.

According to an official release from the brand, the brand new personal fan and table lamps are supposed to help users improve the quality of their immediate physical environment and, therefore, the individuals’ wellbeing. Here, we get into the details of these three new launches:

Dyson V11 Absolute

The new Dyson V11 Absolute cordless vacuum is now available in stores and is priced at S$999.
The new Dyson V11 Absolute cordless vacuum is now available in stores and is priced at S$999.

Major updates to Dyson’s cordless vacuum cleaner include a new digital motor V11 which, according to the brand, provides “20 per cent more suction power” than the predecessor, the Dyson Cyclone V10. Let’s break this down into numbers: while the previous V10 vacuum’s motor was capable of 150 air watts (the industry’s way of measuring vacuums’ power) of suction, the new V11 motor hits up to 180 air watts.

But that doesn’t necessarily mean that this motor is going at rapid speed all the time. The new V11 vacuum comes with a new cleaner head (the part that touches the floor), also what the brand dubs the “High Torque cleaner head”. In this head is a sensor which detects which floor type it’s on—from hard wooden or marble floors to carpets—and the motor will adjust its suction power to suit the cleansing needs of different floor types. “This enables carpets to be deep cleaned and runtime to be extended on hard floors,” says the brand. And that, too, means that lazy users will never have to drop the vacuum, change the cleaning head from a hard bristle brush to a soft, fluffy brush between hard floors and carpets.

That said, there are fluffy brush applicators for the V11 as well if users prefer to use that for their marble floors. But the automatic High Torque floor-detecting function really serves the lazy ones who can’t be bothered to switch between brushes. The machine does the thinking for you.

The new V11 digital motor reportedly runs up to 8,000 revolutions per minute when necessary. Image courtesy of Dyson.
The new V11 digital motor reportedly runs up to 8,000 revolutions per minute when necessary. Image courtesy of Dyson.

Other updates include a LCD (or liquid crystal display) screen which tells the user of the machine’s battery levels, malfunctions (let’s say if you didn’t slot in the filter correctly), obstructions (if you suck up a lonely sock), and power modes (4 minutes and 20 seconds left). Let’s say if you really did suck up a sock, the LCD screen will display step-by-step instructions to take users through the removal process. That aside, a fully charged V11 runs for 60 minutes.

A LCD (or liquid crystal display, a technology commonly used in laptops and televisions) display at the back of the handle allows users to select power modes, alerts users to any malfunctions in the device, and displays battery levels. Image courtesy of Dyson.
A LCD (or liquid crystal display, a technology commonly used in laptops and televisions) display at the back of the handle allows users to select power modes, alerts users to any malfunctions in the device, and displays battery levels. Image courtesy of Dyson.

While the V10 is currently going at S$899 on the Dyson Singapore e-commerce site and S$799 at Courts, the new V11 is now retailing at S$999. Two hundred bucks for some new motor, software, and bragging rights sounds just about right.

Dyson Pure Cool Me

Dyson's new personal purifying fan will be available in stores in June at S$499.
Dyson’s new personal purifying fan will be available in stores in June at S$499.

While the new personal fan looks quite different from the usual blade-less Dyson fans, the functions are honestly sound quite similar to that of the older fan models.

There is, however, one key change. While the usual blade-less fans serve to ventilate an entire room, this personal fan serves to ventilate a smaller environment. For that, the brand has changed the way it jets air out of the machine.

With the new Pure Cool Me, users won’t find the usual empty hoop that has come to be distinctive of Dyson fans. Instead, there is a convex surface. Air is propelled from opposing directions towards the middle of the convex surface, air meets air, and is directed in one single stream to the user.

Now, you can have your own fan and clean air in your office while your co-workers bask in polluted and bacteria-filled air. Image courtesy of Dyson
Now, you can have your own fan and clean air in your office while your co-workers bask in polluted and bacteria-filled air. Image courtesy of Dyson

You shouldn’t expect this to be a strong jet of air to cool you down on a hot day like a huge, conventional fan might. At the end of the day, the single jet of air serves to ventilate clean air to a small, personal environment—say your office work desk, study table, or your side of the bed.

The key function of the Dyson Pure Cool Me is air purification for users’ immediate indoor environments. “We, the indoor generation, are spending up to 90% of our time working, studying, eating, exercising, sleeping and playing behind closed doors,” the brand explained. “In addition to pollution entering our homes when we open the windows or doors, common everyday activities and household items can also make air dirty.”

At the heart of this fan is personal space. While there isn’t a figure to the weight of this device, it sure is light. You can quite easily lift it up with one hand and bring it around with you.

Dyson’s Pure Cool Me fan will be available in stores in June at S$499.

Dyson Lightcycle

The Dyson Lightcycle task lamp will be available in stores in July at S$799 for the smaller desk iteration and S$1,199 for a floor lamp version. Image courtesy of Dyson
The Dyson Lightcycle task lamp will be available in stores in July at S$799 for the smaller desk iteration and S$1,199 for a floor lamp version. Image courtesy of Dyson

There is a pretty interesting story behind the new Lightcycle lamp—or task light as Dyson has it. Jake Dyson, son of the founder James Dyson, once had his own lighting company and he invented a lighting system with incredible longevity—60 years to be exact.

This light had an entire ecosystem of its own—just so it doesn’t overheat and lose the initial quality of light and performance. Jake Dyson created a hollow copper tube which houses droplets of water. When the lamp is switched on and starts heating up, the droplets of water would draw on the heat produced, condense, and repeat the water cycle—continually cooling the lamp down in the process.

In 2015, Jake’s design was bought over by his father, James Dyson, and incorporated into the Dyson family of devices. Today, it’s launched as task lights—a shorter desk version and another taller floor version.

While most stores will be selling white versions of the Dyson Lightcycle, black iterations of the task light will be made available on the Dyson Singapore e-commerce site. Image courtesy of Dyson
While most stores will be selling white versions of the Dyson Lightcycle, black iterations of the task light will be made available on the Dyson Singapore e-commerce site. Image courtesy of Dyson

When it comes to Dyson’s Lightcycle task light, the point is, once again, personalisation. Link your device to the Dyson Link mobile app and input your geo-location. Say the sun sets at 7:06 PM today. The lamp will start turning down and dim after 7:06 PM too. If that does not fancy you, you can programme your Lightcycle’s behaviour—say if I want to force myself to wake at 6:30 AM, I can programme the light to automatically switch on and shine its brightest white light in my face at 6:25 AM to wake me up before dimming down to a pleasant sunrise glow at 6:30 AM exactly. Likewise, users will be able to do the same for bedtime. Perfect for those who can’t seem to wake up or sleep.

The Dyson Lightcycle will, however, only hit stores this July.